Semicolon is a Naropa University student group whose mission is to provide a unique open space for all Naropa artists and writers to self-publish through community-based learning. This student-run publication hand-makes books and publishes poetry, prose, visual arts, and hybrid work. Semicolon publishes work from the Naropa student body at-large in order to provide an open and supportive community space on paper. It is part of Semicolon’s mission to make available the means and techniques of self-publishing to the student body at large.

If you are a Naropa student interested in joining, we meet every other Wednesday in Lincoln Lecture Hall at 7pm. Contact us at semicolon.naropa@gmail.com for more information or to join our mailing list.

If you’re interested in writing or cool clubs then you should definitely check out Semicolon.

We couldn’t be more excited to be the first ever university in North America to partner with the Royal University of Bhutan!

Learn more about this unique new undergrad study abroad opportunity in the Gross National Happiness Country at http://bit.ly/NUbhutan

thysfunktional:

My school is really cool

thysfunktional:

My school is really cool

suddensmiles:

Chalk art at #snowlion #naropa #boulder #colorado “Do you even full lotus?” #spiritualmaterialism #yoga #padmasana

suddensmiles:

Chalk art at #snowlion #naropa #boulder #colorado “Do you even full lotus?” #spiritualmaterialism #yoga #padmasana

Davod Azad performs #SacredMusic @GPIW #ContemplativeAlliance Conf. #Naropa40

Davod Azad performs #SacredMusic @GPIW #ContemplativeAlliance Conf. #Naropa40

Sharon Salzberg gave a wonderful talk last night, as our 2014 Frederick P. Lenz Distinguished Guest Lecturer in Buddhist Studies and American Culture and Values

Sharon Salzberg gave a wonderful talk last night, as our 2014 Frederick P. Lenz Distinguished Guest Lecturer in Buddhist Studies and American Culture and Values

Out in the Sticks

As a teenager I attended a funky boarding school of about 45 students in rural New Hampshire, situated on a working organic farm and led an open-minded, peaceful and reflective Quaker tradition. While we sat in silence as an entire community for anywhere between a few moments to 15 minutes to a couple of hours, as a junior I began a sitting meditation practice. I also had the fortunate of taking a month long trip throughout China, Mongolia, and Tibet with a few students and a faculty member that year as I began to study the history of these cultures and their traditions.

For reasons I cannot explain yet for which am endlessly grateful, a Naropa University admissions rep drove two and a half hours away from Boston to a boarding school out in the sticks in order to visit perhaps five students for only an hour. Immediately, I was convinced that I would attend Naropa, for the gesture she had shown in visiting us, which no other college rep had done over the three years I was there, and of course from what she told us about the university’s philosophy, pedagogy, and course offerings. In addition to a business card, I was given a sticker of the Earth. As a matter of fact, the Earth is painted on the barn door at my high school, and the parallel resonated with me deeply.

I circled most of the courses in the catalog and told everyone I knew about my plans to attend Naropa. I took a year off to travel Europe and the States, having spent two summers on a farm in western Colorado, which included hitchhiking across the Continental Divide a couple of times to visit Boulder and the Arapahoe campus. In the autumn of ‘03 I walked in with my straw hat and guitar into Sangha House, the freshman dorms at the time, to begin a memorable four years as a member of the Naropa community. I have a profound affection for Naropa and the people I have known from the university. I wouldn’t at all be who I am today without having attended, and for that I am extraordinarily grateful.

I had jumped off the path of science and started dancing later in life. While in an improv class I was approached by one of my new peers who told me I should be a dance therapist. I had no idea what she meant and was invited to  a dance therapy symposium here in Chicago. I attended and fell in love with the field.
I came home and began researching master’s programs. I found NYU, Hunter, UCLA, and Goucher and began applying. One evening as my boyfriend at the time was reading “Chop Wood Carry Water” he called to me from the living room “there is a dance therapy program in Boulder called Naropa.” My whole body lit up. I didn’t quite know why. But it did. 
And I ripped up my applications, perhaps foolishly, and decided I wanted to go to Naropa.  And then the application came in the mail and I lied down in the park to read it and I cried as I felt that I found home!
Since that summer of 1986 I listen to what draws me and I take the risks involved in order to follow the inner passion and motivation to grow. Naropa guided me, pushed me, and supported my voice; my value; my vision.

I had jumped off the path of science and started dancing later in life. While in an improv class I was approached by one of my new peers who told me I should be a dance therapist. I had no idea what she meant and was invited to  a dance therapy symposium here in Chicago. I attended and fell in love with the field.

I came home and began researching master’s programs. I found NYU, Hunter, UCLA, and Goucher and began applying. One evening as my boyfriend at the time was reading “Chop Wood Carry Water” he called to me from the living room “there is a dance therapy program in Boulder called Naropa.” My whole body lit up. I didn’t quite know why. But it did. 

And I ripped up my applications, perhaps foolishly, and decided I wanted to go to Naropa.  And then the application came in the mail and I lied down in the park to read it and I cried as I felt that I found home!

Since that summer of 1986 I listen to what draws me and I take the risks involved in order to follow the inner passion and motivation to grow. Naropa guided me, pushed me, and supported my voice; my value; my vision.

Naropa did not find me—-I found it while my wife and I were visiting a number of Buddhist sites in Colorado after having moved there. A flyer on one of the bulletin boards spoke of the Chaplaincy program and I told my wife “This sounds interesting.”

I have now been a chaplain for over 15 years, having been Board Certified in 2006. I was part of Spiritual Care teams sent to Ground Zero after the attack and to Louisiana after Katrina, and I spent 5 years as the Heart Services Anchor Chaplain at one of the top 10 hospitals in the U.S. My Naropa education has enabled me to be of service where the suffering has been greatest. I’m still paying for that education, but in the end I have to admit it was worth it.

Gassho,

Chap. Mikel Ryuho Monnett, BCC, CDCA, SWA

Master of Arts in Buddhist Studies (Concentration in Engaged Buddhism)

Class of 1999